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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 126-137

Use of ergogenic supplements by young athletes in a sports specialized school


1 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, TIRR Memorial Hermann, Houston, Texas, USA
2 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Puerto Rico, School of Medicine, San Juan, Puerto Rico, USA
3 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida, USA
4 Puerto Rico Clinical and Translational Research Center, Medical Sciences Campus University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico, USA
5 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan, Puerto Rico, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Manuel F Mas
Carr 844 Km 0.5 Cupey Bajo, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 00928
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jisprm.jisprm_55_19

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Background: Few studies have examined the use of ergogenic supplements (ESs) by young athletes residing in a sports specialized school. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 120 students from a sports specialized school (ages 12–19) completed a questionnaire to assess the prevalence of use of ES according to sex, sport, type of supplement, reasons for use, knowledge of supplements, and sources of information. Results: Most athletes were males (55%) and participated in track and field (32%). Mean age was 14.7 ± 1.6 years. Approximately 98% of athletes indicated using one or more supplements. Sport beverages (95.0%), proteins/amino acids (57%), and vitamins (54%) were the most commonly used. Athletes practicing racquet sports were more likely to consume proteins/amino acids every day than those in any other type of sport (P < 0.05). The adjusted odds of using vitamins were 14% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.22–3.30) and 71% (95% CI: 0.09–0.96) lower among athletes practicing explosive sports and high intensity, respectively, as compared to those practicing endurance-intensive sports. On the other hand, the odds of using proteins/amino acids was higher for those practicing explosive (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.48, 95% CI: 1.02–11.86) and high-intensity (AOR: 2.88, 95% CI: 1.00–8.26) sports. Approximately 62% of athletes used supplements to improve performance. Only 8% of athletes were willing to use a prohibited substance to achieve participation in the Olympics. Conclusion: There was a very high prevalence of use of ES in a sports specialized school. Education regarding supplement use is warranted for athletes, coaches, and family.


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