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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 2: Contralateral cervical changes in anatomic neutral and torsion. (a and b) Trapezius muscle: as the neck rotates from the neutral to right torsional position, the left (contralateral) descending and caudal portions of the trapezius do not change significantly upon rotation. (c) Anterior and Middle Scalenes: The contralateral middle and anterior scalene flatten and decrease in thickness with torsion. The left brachial plexus becomes less conspicuous due to the obliquity and anisotropic artifact. (d) Left Sternocleidomastoid: as the neck rotates to the torsional position, the sternocleidomastoid moves laterally over the carotid artery. In addition, the jugular veins distend and become more prominent

Figure 2: Contralateral cervical changes in anatomic neutral and torsion. (a and b) Trapezius muscle: as the neck rotates from the neutral to right torsional position, the left (contralateral) descending and caudal portions of the trapezius do not change significantly upon rotation. (c) Anterior and Middle Scalenes: The contralateral middle and anterior scalene flatten and decrease in thickness with torsion. The left brachial plexus becomes less conspicuous due to the obliquity and anisotropic artifact. (d) Left Sternocleidomastoid: as the neck rotates to the torsional position, the sternocleidomastoid moves laterally over the carotid artery. In addition, the jugular veins distend and become more prominent